PTSD Sensors for Returning Troops

The Pentagon wants to know how its soldiers are handling the transition from wartime to regular life. But getting them to see a counselor isn’t easy, even in the age of Oprah. So the Defense Department’s fringe science division is funding development of wireless sensors (scroll down) to tell whether a veteran is stressed or hitting the bottle too hard after coming home from deployment.
stareA.jpgAFrame Digital and Barron Associates, both based in Virginia, are focusing on veterans recovering from battlefield injuries. They both are investigating a “low-cost, noninvasive ‘trip-wire’ system [that] required that functions as a safety net, detecting when assistance or intervention is needed and issuing advisories to health care providers concerning significant changes in important medical indicators.” These monitors will “collect and analyze real time data of vital signs, patient activity, fall acceleration and location parameters to detect deviations.” AFrame already makes a version for seniors, that picks up “pulse, temperature, and mobility” and comes with a “panic button and fall detection.”
Massachusetts’ Erallo Technologies is focusing on whether a vet falls down from drink or stress, instead. According to the Associated Press, one in eight returning troops has PTSD symptoms. CNN puts it at one in five. Its “Intelligent, Wireless, Agent-based Health Monitoring Network for PTSD and Alcohol” will include “a wireless transdermal alcohol sensor, heart rate monitor and accelerometer.”
Presumably, like AFrame, Erallo is expecting its system will incorporate “socially acceptable form factors, secure wireless networks, intelligent analysis software, displays for medical personnel, and interfaces to medical record systems.”
But those form factors better be pretty dammn small. Because if a soldier feels shy about paying a private visit to a therapist, how eager is he going to be to walk around with some clunky armband?

  • Byron Skinner

    Good Afternoon Folks,
    This is an insult to all the women and men who serive in our Military. PTSD is a complex medical problem that is in some cases life threatening. Treating soldiers returning form a war zone the same as pedifites and other hight risk crinimals is an outrage.
    PTSD is a medical problem and the people who suffer from it deserve the best possable medical care that this country can provide, not a dog collar.
    Research by the V.A. as far back as 1942 (3ed. and 45th. ID’s) shows that there is a fininate amount of combat that a human being can endure before suffering problems. Soldiers who have more then 222 days, life time, of exposeure to combat are going to have problems and the longer they are involved in combat the more severe these problems are going to be.
    Think Audie Murphy, who comitted suicide several years after WWII.
    The solution to future PTSD problems is to spread the burden of combat around to more members of society instead of the few that currently being psychologically burned out by returned trips to Afghanistan and Iraq.
    ALLONS,
    Byron Skinner

  • willie jones

    I went to know more about (ptsd)
    I was in the Army Oct 20,1972 to Oct 17,1975.
    Navy july 21,1976 to june 30,1978.
    I got a letter to report,put i did’nt.

  • Tomcatboy

    Audie Murphy committed suicide? He died in a plane crash in the 1970’s…

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